Avengers: Endgame is the beautiful goodbye that we deserved

Marvel Cinematic Universe has many films still lined up in production, with Spiderman: Far Away from Home due to hit the screens in just six weeks. We know that Black Panther will get a sequel and another Guardians of the Galaxy film should also be underway. But in many ways, some would say in the most crucial and substantial ways, Avengers: Endgame is a conclusion to a broad and hefty storyline, birthed in small bursts throughout a decade.

Read more: A roadmap to Endgame: Everything you need to know

Where they stand now

The film opens to a morose aftermath of Thanos’ destruction. Every Avenger is reeling from the loss, the dismantling of their team and family which is what they have proven to become over the years. In some way, every one blames his or herself and nobody blames the other. It is a collective defeat which visibly and understandably has taken an incredible toll on each of them. Their beliefs and everything they stood for have been shattered. Only Hulk can be arguably said to be in a better place and perhaps has find the most harmonious spot in coexisting as both Hulk and Dr. Banner.

Read more: A love letter to MCU from a fan with no ticket

Black Widow is shown that it is all but what she can do to keep hold of herself by constantly communicating with each other, keeping track of their missions and hoping that Rhodes can find her best friend, Agent Barton (Hawk-Eye) who has taken a turn for the worse. Captain America is seen doing what would seem perfect for him if he was not usually busy saving the planet – leading a support group for those who have all lost somebody.

Did Thanos really do the world any good?

In Infinity War, Thanos made a valid point. The world might have been better off with half the population gone. We could assume that half of its problems would disappear too. But the movie shows that as long as people would remain who remember the lost ones, the world would be a living hell for those left behind. Some parts of Earth are also shown in how they have reacted to the change – some have become abandoned and haunted-like, some have erected rows upon rows of pillars with the names of the lost.

Damage-control

The remaining avengers don’t give up hope. (Spoiler Alert: only if you haven’t seen the trailer), the return of Ant-Man gives them all a direction to start working in. Thanos was able to do what he did because he had possession of the six infinity stones which he collected across a couple of movies. If you also remember, in Infinity War, Dr. Strange – the man who has seen 14 million possible future outcomes – willingly gives away the time stone to Thanos. Here is your biggest clue to the reversal of all the damage. Let’s just say that there were a lot of references to time travel movies and not one of them included Marvel’s (not so) very own X-Men Days of Future Past.

Captain Marvel

The pre-release film promotions had placed a lot of hyped on Marvel’s latest addition to its superheroes – Captain Marvel. One could fear that she would in some overpowering way steal the show. But you can rest assured that the people who were there from the beginning are the ones who undoubtedly see their missions to the end. There are a lot of twists and turns, beautiful scenes which serve as short homages to the stories being told for years, the underlying emotions, the character’s developments and the closures that they never got.

A deserving good-bye

What has always made Marvel films great isn’t just that they can tell superhero stories well, or that their action sequences are breathtaking or even that they almost unfailingly deliver the unthinkable each time. For a die-hard fan, the films are protracted distortions of our own realties. Fantastical and mythical, the fact that there are so many different characters ensure that there’s something everyone watching the film can connect to. Watching the film can be transformative in that it’s not just the characters playing out their roles on screen – the same energy can be felt coursing through the viewers themselves.

Chris Evans and Robert Downey Jr. have both pretty much confirmed that the Endgame would be their last Marvel film. The same can be assumed for Mark Ruffalo and maybe even Chris Hemsworth. Endgame portrays each of these brilliant characters in their own essences, fitting into their perfectly carved shape in the Avengers team. We are far away from the Tony Stark we first saw – the dashing, narcissistic playboy.

Captain America has always shown to have a heart of gold and despite the superhuman alterations to his biology, time and time again, he proves that it is his heart, his goodness and sheer willpower that amplify his strength. A nod to the scene in Infinity War where he singlehandedly is able to stall Thanos, in Endgame too he beseeches the audience with what he is able to accomplish through his worthiness.

Tony Stark and Dr. Banner put their brains together one more time and Avengers: Endgame ends as a story of emotional and physical battle, victory with which must come loss, families being torn apart and families being pieced together. It is a well rounded conclusion to the arc started by Thanos and his quench for what he deems to be peace. The movie’s strengths lie in the usuals – acting, plot, buildup. Additionally, the shooting locations are spectacular and more diverse than Infinity War and it definitely did not seem like a 3 hour long movie. Lastly, the action scenes and the energy with which they reverberate demand that you watch the film on the big screen. 

Verdict

A 4.5 out of 5 rating is fitting for Stan Lee’s last.

Avengers: Endgame pays respect to its origins and the expansive career of the stalwart and manages to avoid cliches in exploring a theme that is well-known in the sci-fi realm.

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