The Lenovo Z5 made headlines across the internet when it was originally announced. The Vice President of Lenovo released sketches and pictures suggesting a fully bezel-less screen along with flagship beating specs and an enormous 4 terabytes of internal storage. For a phone that’s classed as a budget phone, it was quite the boast. Now that it has been released, it’s safe to say that all of these were blatant lies, but that doesn’t make this a bad phone to get. I got one for myself last month and it’s a phone that has its own pros and cons like any other.

Specs

The Lenovo Z5 comes with a mid-line Snapdragon 636 processor with an octa-core 1.8 GHz CPU. The GPU used on this device is the Adreno 509, which is admittedly a fairly high end GPU for a phone. With 6 GB of RAM and 64 or 128 GB of internal storage which can be expanded with a memory card, it’s safe to say that the phone has no shortage of memory. It comes with a built in Chinese version of Android 8.0. The specs on this phone are not the best in the world, but certainly up there with the best budget phones out there, either equaling or outright beating other budget phones. It comes with a 3300 MAh battery that can be charge very quickly thanks to its type-C USB quick charging. The phone is sure to run most if not all games on the Play Store at the highest graphical quality, which might make gamers pick this up over other phones in its class.

The specs on this phone are not the best in the world, but certainly up there with the best budget phones out there, either equaling or outright beating other budget phones.

Display and Appearance

The phone looks absolutely gorgeous. Built with glass on the front and back, it really looks like a premium phone bought for a lot more money than it actually costs. However, it is not completely bezel-less, as the VP of Lenovo had alluded. It has an iPhone X-esque notch and a chin. The screen is an IPS LED screen that displays brilliant colors 402 ppi density with a 1080p resolution. The screen is 6.2 inches, and the screen-to-body ratio is 83.6%.

Camera

The camera was also hyped to be something special. While it certainly is very good, it’s not as good as it was rumored to be. The dual back camera has a resolution of 16 MP and 8 MP with dual LED dual tone flash. It has an AI camera as rumored but it’s not as groundbreaking as it was supposed to be. The camera has the standard features of HDR, panorama and the rest that you can find in most phones these days. The front camera is a bit of a letdown. While the 8 MP camera does a fine job during daytime or in good lighting, it really breaks down in bad lighting situations.

The phone looks absolutely gorgeous. Built with glass on the front and back, it really looks like a premium phone bought for a lot more money than it actually costs. However, it is not completely bezel-less, as the VP of Lenovo had alluded.

Miscellaneous

The phone comes with a headphone jack, a rarity in the post iPhone 7 age. It has a slot for a second sim, which is also the SD card slot. It has a really good speaker built into the phone, to the point where I really didn’t feel like using my earphones, at least when not in public. It has a fingerprint sensor on the back, as well as accelerometer, proximity sensor and other standard sensors.

Verdict

The Lenovo Z5 is a very good phone to get for the price. Priced at around 200 Euros, expected it to be around 25,000 in Bangladeshi Taka when it reaches our shores. However, it is nowhere near as good as it was marketed to be, and that certainly takes a few points off of the overall score for the phone. I would still recommend it to the reader if you want to purchase a phone without killing your wallet, while also having a luxurious looking phone that plays games well.

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